How to Combat Negative Reactions to Your Choice to Embrace Natural Hair 

Here is a guest post from our friends at Hairstylehub.com on transitioning to Natural Hair, and how to keep it positive. Thanks, Maureen for sharing your personal insights with us, and as always, we hope to educate and inspire, and invite you to share your personal hair stories by emailing me at howtohairgirl@gmail.com

How to Combat Negative Reactions to Your Choice to Embrace Natural Hair

Natural hair has become more and more common over the last decade. Women are making the decision to embrace their natural hair for all sorts of reasons. Many credit this spike in popularity to the wealth of information about natural hair care that’s now easily accessible, as well as the wide range of products catered to natural hair that are now available.

Personally, I was tired of the uncomfortable (and sometimes downright painful) process of getting relaxers and I was ready for a change. Regardless of the motivation behind the decision, learning to embrace one’s natural hair is a journey for most women. A big part of that journey is learning to break free from negative ideas that we’ve been conditioned to believe about natural hair. But even once you’ve done that, you might still find yourself bumping heads with people in your circle who still subscribe to the notion that natural hair isn’t beautiful, presentable, or professional. Here are some ways to deal with negative comments about your natural hair.

Consider Transitioning

If you have not yet taken the plunge into the world of natural hair and you have hesitations about how you and others will react to seeing your natural texture, consider transitioning. Transitioning lets you grow out your hair for an extended period of time and cut off your relaxed ends when your natural hair has reached a length you’re comfortable with. When I transitioned, I blended my natural new growth and my relaxed hair with curly styles such as braid outs, roller sets, and  rod sets. Transitioning allowed me to gradually get used to seeing myself with textured hair, which made my eventual big chop less shocking and drastic for me and those around me.

How To Respond

In a perfect world, all of your friends, family members, and colleagues will be (at best) supportive of or (at worst) indifferent to your decision to  embrace your natural hair. This was the case with me, but I lucked out. You might have at least one person in your circle who is critical of your decision, which could lead to off-handed comments about your hair. If this happens, try not to get defensive. Be confident and politely let them know that natural hair is beautiful and that you made this decision for you and no one else. You don’t owe anyone an explanation about such a personal choice, but you can offer one if you choose. You never know: you might be able to turn an awkward encounter into a teachable moment.

Surround Yourself With Positivity

One of the best things you can do when you are newly natural is surround yourself with like-minded people. If you have friends/family/colleagues who have natural hair, use them as a support system: ask them questions, get advice, vent about your frustrations. You won’t need to explain or defend your decision to return to natural hair because the people in your support system have already made the decision themselves. If you are the lone natural in your circle, you can always turn to the internet to find a support system. There are a variety of natural hair blogs, forums, and social media pages where you can find and connect with other naturals from all over the world. I joined an online natural hair forum while I was transitioning and it was hugely helpful. I learned a lot about natural hair care and connected with some great people.

Get To Know Your Hair

One of keys to a successful natural hair journey is finding products and styling techniques that work best for your hair. This can be a tricky process and it’s often a source of frustration for many new naturals. Experiment with products and do research on what types of products generally work best for your hair texture (keeping in mind your hair’s thickness, density, porosity, etc). A bad hair day can take a toll on even the most confident among us. I generally practice new hair styles over the weekend so I have time for a do-over if it doesn’t come out the way I anticipated.

The Take-Away

So if you ever encounter negativity in response to your natural hair, remind yourself why you started your journey. Hold your head high and remember that your natural hair is beautiful and one of the many characteristics that make you unique. If you’re not yet completely comfortable with your natural hair, don’t be afraid to fake it ‘til you make it!

Henna for Natural Texture Hair

Hi babes! Here is a guest post from Patrina, natural hair blogger behind naturalhairqueen.net

She reached out to see if I would be interested in publishing a guest post and of course, I said hell yasss because I have been so thirsty for some natural texture hair blog love to share here at HTHG.

To begin with, I want to acknowledge that The Natural Hair Journey represents something deeper rooted for women of color ( if you are a woman of color, you already know this on such a real level )  And many white folks don’t know the beginning of it myself included, but I am striving to understand more.

I want to honor and hold space for those journeys here, because I really feel that bridging an understanding gap between all of us can be achieved in a big way, through our hair. And, because natural textured hair is so beautiful and unique and dynamic, and requires a different ritual of care.

Thanks, Patrina, for sharing with us your favorite way to use

Henna for Natural Textured Hair. 

Photo by Kevar Whilby on Unsplash

Henna is one of the most useful things in a naturalista’s cabinet. It’s not just a hair dye. It’s a power-packed nourishing ingredient for strengthening the hair that comes from the Lawsonia inermis plant.

It’s exciting to think that Ancient Egypt and India used henna in their hair regimens and that it’s still being used today. I love going back to the basics with the products I use because they are a pure, natural, and a pleasant step away from the commercial products on the shelves. Plus, you know it has to be good if women have been using it for thousands of years.

When I first started using henna, I only wanted to cover a few gray hairs, but what I discovered was something way beyond a hair dye. What I found is that while most hair dyes break down the protein in hair, henna works to strengthen and condition it.

Henna won’t color your hair, so if you’re looking for a significant change, you won’t see it. It’s more like a slight tint, which is perfect if you just want to give a minor reddish tone to grays to make them less noticeable.

But like I said, henna is so much more than a way to dye your hair naturally. It works to coat the hair and fill in gaps on the hair shaft. Henna is not a protein treatment, but it is similar because it repairs and protects weak and fine strands.

How to Find Quality Henna

The first step to getting started with henna is to find a quality product. Looking for henna can be confusing because there are many products to choose from, and the one in the conventional hair dye box looks like it will be the easiest to use.

However, it’s the pre-mixed henna you want to stay away from if you want the most natural and potent product. Henna that comes in tubes and tubs most likely has dye, additives and other junk you don’t want in your hair or body.

Instead, look for henna that comes in powder form. Jamila and Nupur are two trusted brands you can use for pure henna. Real henna requires you to do some work, but it will be worth it in the end because your hair will be shinier, healthier, and tinted without the use of chemicals or other harmful ingredients.

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Figure 1 Photo by Tamarcus Brown on Unsplash

How Often Should You Use Henna?

I must admit, I don’t use henna as frequently now as I did in the beginning. It’s a long process that can easily take one full day to complete. Now I only use it when I feel my hair needs it, or when I’m in the mood to treat my hair to a proper conditioning.

Aim to use henna once per month to strengthen and condition hair if you’re new to using it. Applying it more frequently could lead to breakage. Henna has a drying factor, so you always want to deep condition your hair afterward.

How to Make and Apply Henna

One thing about henna is that it’s messy. You’ll want to avoid applying it in your bedroom or anywhere that doesn’t have hard surfaces. You can clean it from the shower walls, but you should cover your bathroom counters and floor with newspaper to make it easier to clean up.

Make the henna the day before because it takes about 12 hours for the powder to activate. Here are some excellent ingredients to mix with henna:

Peppermint, eucalyptus, rosemary, or tea tree oils. These four essential oils will add an antifungal and antimicrobial layer to your henna mix for excellent scalp health. Peppermint, eucalyptus, and rosemary essential oils work well to stimulate the hair follicles and get the hair to grow.

Coffee or black tea. Caffeine helps to stimulate the scalp, and the dark colors of coffee and tea deepen the shade naturally.

Cinnamon or paprika. These two herbs will change the tint of your henna to more red or cinnamon brown.

Apple Cider Vinegar. Mixing ACV with henna will help to balance pH and restore the overall health of the hair shaft.

Avoid mixing coconut or other hair oils in with your henna because it will change the texture and make it difficult for the henna to grab onto the strand.

You’ll need about ½ cup of liquid to one package of powder, but be sure to read the instructions on your particular package.

Henna may react with metal, so use a plastic spoon to mix. The consistency of your henna should be like yogurt, and it should be smooth. Blend well. Then let the henna sit covered at room temperature for 12 hours.

The henna will be ready to apply the following day. Part your hair into sections and coat the hair thoroughly with the mixture. Then cover with a plastic shower cap and leave it on your hair for 1-8 hours. The longer you leave it on, the more the colors will have a chance to tint your hair.

Use a moisturizing shampoo to wash the henna from your hair. Then rinse, and voila—all done!

 

Photo by JD Mason on Unsplash

I always follow a henna treatment with a deep conditioner because the henna can be drying. I usually add ingredients to a natural store-bought brand. Every head of hair is individual, unique, and has its own characteristics. Adding your choice of ingredients to a store-bought moisturizing deep conditioner is a way to customize it to fit your own needs.

My favorite ingredients to add to deep conditioner are honey, peppermint, eucalyptus, avocado oil, and jojoba oil. These additions are fantastic for drawing in moisture and nourishing the scalp and hair shaft. I leave the deep conditioner on my hair for at least two hours, and then I rinse and detangle in the shower.

Henna will make your hair softer, shinier, and stronger. I’ll be the first to admit that using henna is a long process, but it’s worth your time to try it at least once.

Now, it’s your turn to discuss. Have you tried henna on your natural hair?

Bio: 

Patrina is the founder of Naturalhairqueen.net; a blog to educate and inspire women with natural hair. Patrina just celebrated her 10-year natural hair anniversary, and achieved her goal of waist length hair. With the knowledge she has learned over the years she is dedicated to share her knowledge, and experience to educate women who wish to have moisturized, healthy natural long hair.

Social Media: 

Website: www.Naturalhairqueen.net

Facebook: www.facebook.com/naturalhairqueensite/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/NatHairQueen

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nathairqueen/

Finger Painting Haircolor: Curly Prisms

For my curly sisters out there, here is a post about prismatic hair color and curls……I had been wanting to paint rainbows into curly hair for quite a while now. I wanted to see what it would look like to hide some little prisms within the wild texture of natural curls.

During the Summer, I went to a little Island called Lopez to take a Flower Magic essences and arranging workshop. While I was there, I met a flower farmer named Lindsey who taught us how to arrange flowers and make beautiful flower crowns. I remembered how she had mentioned wanting some rainbow color in her gorgeous, thick natural curls.

I posted something on Instagram about wanting to paint some curly rainbows, and she responded. Within a week, she was in the chair getting her hair finger painted with little rainbows and chatting with me about flowers and grandmas and Island life.

My intentions for her haircolor were to add some brightness and some color to her hair in this grayest time of year, to hold her over until her flowers began to bloom. Also, I wanted something that would be subtle enough to grow out without any fuss, and not scare her grandmother.

I wanted to show her some simple color skills to bring to the Island to share with her friends should they ever want rainbows too…..You just never know when someone is going to want a rainbow in their hair! And all you need to do ’em is veggie dye in primary colors ( I use Manic Panic) and bleach ( I use 40 developer generally for lightening bits of natural hair.

Here is how I did it…….I first mixed bleach and 40 volume developer in a plastic bowl, with a large paint brush. Then, I randomly painted the bleach onto individual curls, working and saturating it into the ends and softly feathering the color up the strand for a seamless transition. I let her sit for about 45 minutes with the bleach in her hair, then rinsed and washed her hair. I had her rough-dry it while I finished up Elke’s rainbows (from last week;)

Then, I worked through her hair to find the lighter pieces and then I used my fingers to paint the colors in, blending each shade into the next down the strands of lightened hair. I wasn’t too picky about it. I wanted some rainbows to bleed into her natural hair too, so as to add more dimension and tone. She sat for a half hour or so, and then I rinsed her out. As her hair dried, we marveled at the pretty colors popping into the light. Her hair came alive, even in the less-than-ideal low light of sundown. Can’t wait to see her rainbows in the sun!

Thanks for stopping by! If you are curly, I hope you never feel excluded from the fun of rainbow hair.

xoxo, HTHG

Curl Wisdom and Embracing the Hairbrush with Josie of Curandera Remedies

I met Josie at this year’s Spirit Weavers Gathering, where we bonded over her gorgeous curls and her love of brushing them. As you all know, I really love to meet a woman who fully embraces her curly hair, and her silver sparkles. To me, embracing the hair is just a small part of a bigger shift in consciousness that leads to healing and change on a much larger level.

I’m always curious about what has led a woman to love her own hair, especially in our culture that traditionally encourages all women to try to make their hair look like Pantene Hair. I also love to see a curly woman who is not afraid of a hairbrush. ( If you are curly or kinky textured you know what I am saying.)

Josie was born into a family rooted in the healing arts of curan-dería, shape shifting and clairvoyance. She is a healer and a maker of remedies which I highly suggest checking out. With her beautiful dark ringlets laced with sparkling silver that blings in the sun, she was kind enough to offer us some insight into her own hair journey, including her brushing routine and some wisdom from her Mexican-Cuban roots.


HTHG JC5What is your full name and where are you from?

My full name is Iosellev Castaneda and I was born in Mexico City, MX

Tell me a bit about what you are up to these days, where you live,
Curandera Remedies and how you got into it.

collection
I live in Miami, Florida. I relocated about 16 months ago from NYC where I lived for 19+ years. While living & working in NYC, as a Fashion Designer, I found my path as a healer. The hustle and bustle of the Fashion industry burned me out. It was then I began to seek a healthier, more conscious lifestyle. Through Meditatoin, Yoga, and herbalism I found a new way of seeing the world. It is what inspired me want to share these teachings with Curandera Remedies.

Curandera Remedies began as a way to share the many tools I learned for a conscious, happy lifestyle. It blossomed along with my students and clients when I began to make personalized apothecary products. Today the mission is to promote alternative healing and raise conscious harmony in everyone. The brand is inspired by folk medicine, homesteading, and global connection.

What is your heritage on both sides? Where do you think you got that
beautiful hair from?

HTGH JC7

I am a Mexican-Cuban by heritage. My mom has Toltec Indian ‘cabello quebrado’ aka wavy hair and my dad has afro-textured hair. My hair definitely a mix of both, it is super limp and loose when wet but it dries in curls and depending on the weather it is either loose curls or tight curls.

What were you raised with as far as haircare/ hair beliefs/ Hair remedies/
Hair styling

My dad has been an advocate for my curly hair, as photos prove with the afro. But my mom was the one who ultimately took care of it. Because she had no idea how to care for it, and none did either, most of my childhood I had short hair. As I grew up and was introduced to more mixed raced friends in the US, I learned various ways to style my hair.

Did you have anyone in your life that did your hair for you as a kid?

Yes, my dad. He knew how to style and comb out my hair when it was dry.

Any hair wisdom from the cultures you were raised in?

HTHG JC3

Well my maternal grandmother kept her hair jet black with an ash mask made of Mamey pit. I’ve yet to try this, specially with my premature graying hair, lol!! But it’s on my list.

What is your hair routine / MO these days?

Wash and moisturize with alcohol free shampoo & conditiner. Natural hair mask atleast once a week, sometimes it’s a mix of hot oils other times natural avocado, mayo, or egg. Very few times I’ve use a store bought hair mask. I style it with alcohol free mousse or hair pomade. If i really want a sure hold I’ll dab some gel.

As a curly haired woman, what inspired you to start brushing your hair?

A few times in my life I’ve had my hair chemically altered, and these times i always love brushing my hair!! It made my hair very shiny. Today I brush my hair after washing it, to style it. And depending on the day and how I’m feeling, I also brush it before bed.

What do you like about brushing your hair?
HTHG JC6

Brushing my hair wet to style makes the curls pop and I love that!! When dry, it feels delicious on my scalp though the combed out hair isn’t something I’ve yet fallen in love with.

Have you always loved and embraced your curls, or did you have a hair
rebellion at any point?

I didn’t really love my hair until I moved to NYC. It was then I discovered, at age 17, how fall and winter weather affected my hair. I also learned then the use of alcohol free products. A few times I did relax my hair, mostly because I wanted to experience something different. But the more I did the more I loved my natural hair when I decided to ‘go back’.

Do you have a hair mantra?

No but I friend once told me ‘when a gal embraces her curls, she has fully embraced herself’, lovely isn’t it.

Any hair stories from your youth that stick out?HTHG JC1

When I was 15, I had my hair set in rollers and blown out for the first time. It was also the first time someone gave me a hair compliment. Isn’t that wacky? It’s no wonder curly hair gals opt for chemical changes instead of embracing their gorgeous curls!!!

Thanks Josie for sharing your words and wisdom! Please take some time to check out Josie’s offerings here, and follow her on Instagram.

Thanks for reading!
xo, HTHG

Curly Hair Wisdom from your Best Curl Friends

IMG_2511Hi babes it’s me, your curly haired curl friend.

! As part 2 of our Curly Hair Series, I wanted to share the wonderful Curly Hair Wisdom that was passed to me when I posted the Question “What are your favorite Curly Hair tips, tricks, oils, remedies, theories, and routines?”

Today, I am thanking all who contributed from the bottom of my heart as I share your answers anonymously so that we can all hopefully learn a few new Curly Hair tricks worth trying.

To begin with, my friend Josie shared this quote, which I love.

When A Curly gal embraces her curls, she has fully embraced herself.

So for all my curly haired sisters, this post is for you, to help inspire you on your hair journey.

Curly Hair Wisdom from your Curl Friends

 


“I think all curly heads learn that shampoo is a rarity and conditioner is a daily, be it coconut oil, argan oil, castor oil, or a leave-in conditioning cream. I have them all in rotation and decide in the moment what is needed. Brushes feel amazing on my scalp, but make my curls wild ) Well, wilder) for a few days, so combing with fingers or something as lovely as a wooden comb are essential.”

 

“Always go alcohol-free on all that touches your curls, and moisturize with a hair mask at least every other week.

I’ve taken to Fractionated coconut oil along with shea butter after a wash with Suave shampoo and some Nubian conditioner.”

“Argan oil over naturally dried hair!

“My trick for smooth curls on my daughters hair is using Lush’s Hair Honey and Plant Makeup’s Herbal Mist.”

“Love my curly locks! I don’t brush my curls, except when my hair is wet. Also, I like to condition with coconut oil masque twice a week. I use Argan oil to smooth it out, and a coconut based gel to tame it.”

“When it comes down to the brass tax of 33 years of curls, (and a hairstylist mother trying every last trick and product in the book ) twist those towel-blotted locks with coconut oil while fresh out of the shower, pick it out during a heavy conditioning and they will last a week!”

“I bring out my curls by drying them with a cotton t-shirt instead of a towel.”

“I have a lot of dark brown curls. I have been searching for organic, natural hair care for years. I wash my hair once a week.. I brush my scalp before I wash my hair with Shea Moisture shampoo, and use a comb when I condition it. I use Yarok Feed your Curls and Yarok Feed Your Ends as styling products, and scrunch it while it dries.”

“No shampoo except once or twice a month! Condition the whole time i’m in the shower, then comb with a wide toothed comb. Add yummy moisture product. Curl with my fingers, and keep scrunching!”

“No washing, lot’s of sweat and brushing. I use 2 kinds of brushes, wooden to get the tangles out, then synthetic bristle to smooth. Then a lot of times I smooth argan oil over the baby hairs and ends, for a little bit of a wetted down wavy look. But unlike most, I love a humid, misty rainy day for my hair so if it’s doing that outside, that is all I need!”

“Hairstory New Wash once a week, Hairstory Hair Balm every time I rinse. Scrunch it in wet, shake it out as it dries!”

“Not only do I have curls, but I have lots and lots of gray curls! Coconut oil is my favorite, brushed though the root using my Free Your Hair Brush and putting it in braids before going to bed ( my mother always said ‘Never brush curly hair…….’ Oh how wrong she was! ) This routine helps to soften the kinks and keep the frizz down.”

“Conditioner. I can do without shampoo. I would still love to not rely on commercial conditoner. One product I love is homemade hair gel. 1/4 cup flax seeds, 2 cups water, boil until the consistancy of egg whites, strain and add your favorite essential oil. I scrunch this into my hair in the shower when it is sopping wet. Love!”

“I’ve been rinsing my hair with one cup of strong chamomile tea mixed with one drop chamomile essential oil, then sitting in the sun.”

“A drop or two of rosemary essential oil is the absolute best for adding shine to your hair. Better than any shine drops/serum/spray I have ever used!”

“Someone told me to mix up salt in warm water and spray it in my hair to add a little extra curl.”

“I use a little Dr. Bronner’s on my scalp every few days. Rinse with rosemary and chamomile for natural highlights. Then scrunch in some conditioner and use Deva Curl styling cream. I make sure my hair is super wet and air dry it slowly for the best curl.”

“Condition, condition, condition! I only use a soft t-shirt to scrunch my hair dry after a shower and really integrate in when my hair is still very wet. Lately I’ve been sectioning my hair before twisting to help define my curl more. It takes a little while but I love having time for self care. I only brush my hair before wash day.”

“I have really thick curly to kinky hair and I use Beautiful Curls curly to kinky activation cream mixed with a tiny bit of Giovanni hair gel, but when really hot and humid, I just do braids.”

“Baking soda, Apple cider vinegar. Boom.”

“Camellia oil, coconut oil to deep condition overnight, Keracolor Clenditioner to wash.”

“I mix coconut oil and rosemary essential oil in my spray bottle and I mist/scrunch my curls to keep the frizz down. I twist and then air dry my hair after a shower, never blow dry and never brush it when it is wet.”

“I use Griffin Remedy shampoo and conditioner (mostly just condition, but occasionally shampoo scalp only) Griffin Remedy is vegan and doesn’t have detergent or fragrance. It’s lovely to use. I have a boar bristle brush that I use to stimulate the scalp and move oil down the hair. I braid my hair to sleep, so it won’t tangle at night.”

“Deva Curl Everything for this coarse and frizzy mop.”

“Deva Curl is way to heavy for my fine hair. I love Hairstory New Wash. It has pretty much solved my hair woes and I don’t use any products any more.”

“My fine curls come and go depending on the length, mood, weather. When I see them starting to form, I encourage them with the plop dry method using a t-shirt.”

“I use pure castor oil. Feels kind of like hair gel and works as well as any product i’ve ever used. Although when I wear my hair fully curly, I use Deva Curl products as a safety net fro frizz and overall craziness. The thing with castor oil is that you can only use the teeniest. I have crazy thick hair and anything more than a pea sized amount makes my hair look greasy.”

“Bumble+Bumble’s Hairdresser’s Invisible Oil is my absolute favorite, but I am also partial Davines Beautifying Oil.”

“I almost never use shampoo but condition every time I shower. It’s dry where I live, so sometimes before bed I put some coconut oil directly into my hair. I also use Acure leave-in conditioner and Living Libations hair mask sometimes (mostly cause I love the smell!) I use various curl styling balms but have never found one that I absolutely swear by. Ocean times are the best times……….”

“I have very fine hair that is also very curly (4a) It hates coconut oil and adores a quarter sized dallop of castor oil, along with a leave in conditioner that’s all it needs. Too little product and it becomes dry and brittle which leads to breakage. Too much product and it becomes oily and frizzy. Castor oil must be applied OVER the leave-in while soaking wet, and wrapped in a microfiber towel before air drying. My hair is not porous and needs warm to hot water rinses to help the oil penetrate. No shampoo, as it literally strips it till it breaks off so I use diluted Vinegar rinses, bentonite clay masks and scalp massages to remove excess buildup. Too much de-tangling will completely separate all the tiny curls creating frizz, I must use caution if I want curls and not frizz, making sure to de-tangle it while water is rushing over my head. Welcome to my world!”

“Shea Moisture shampoos and conditioners have been amazing for helping my dry curls. Deva Curl products have not held up in the humidity for me.”

“My curls are especially tricky because they are fine/thin. Giving up shampoo a few years ago worked wonders for me. I’ve also had good luck with Deva Curl styling products.

The Deva Curl line and their philosophy gives me amazing curls. But I would still love to give up ALL commercial hair products. No shampoo or conditioner…….”

“Less is more is definitely my MO for my hair. I love the Hairstory line because they really embrace this philosophy. Keep it simple. New Wash is great for my curls.”

“I literally don’t touch my curls in between rinsing them with warm water occasionally. I spritz them with rose water when they are dry.”

“Swimming in lakes gives me the best possible curls in the Summer!”

“Never rinse out your conditioner.”

“I use Mermaid Hair by Beth Kaya….Sea salt and coconut oil blend plus some other ingredients that make my hair soft, bouncy and smelling nice. Great for fine hair like me because it won’t weight it down. Also, my hair dries quickly so I comb through it in the shower with conditioner and a pic.”

“I wash it once a week with conditioner and let it sit while I do everything else, and use shampoo every other week. I also like to brush it out before my shower-It’s very Gilda Radner- Or use a wide toothed comb while conditioner is in. I style it by twisting it with coconut oil while it’s damo and then go to bed with it draped over my pillow. My ringlets will last up to 10 days with this method. Oh, and a solid scalp massage with conditioner is key for overall well-being!

I wash mine twice a week and condition it every day. I add some leave-in after I brush it out-while it’s still wet, and sort of scrunch it with my head upside down. I have extremely curly hair so this really keeps it tame.”

“I wash it twice a week before bedtime. Part it where I want it parted while it’s still wet. Air dry 75% (slightly damp) Spread it out on my pillow so I’m not lying on it. Sleep. Done. It’s finer than baby fine, there isn’t much of it and it frizzes easily, so I try not to touch it too much. Jaw clips seem to keep the frizz minimal after use if I need to get it out of my face during the day. I just recently started embracing my texture after years of regular half-assed straightening. Only took 25 years or so to finally figure it out! Someone asked me today if I had extensions and I almost died of happiness!”

“I wash it once or twice a week MAX, Morrocan oil, brush out the knots, up in a bun for a bi, let it out, air dry. I think not over-washing it is the key, at least for me.”

“Salt water is magical medicine for this wavy-haired mermaid!”

“My curly hair is so dry- I try not to wash it too much. After a wash I tend to put rose hip oil in it. Or if I don’t have that, I use good olive oil. It is very long at the moment so it goes into a bun or plait during the day. My hair is always easiest to style and manage after I have been in salt water. Not sure what it does but it looks so much better. If I could get that look all the time I would be happy!”

“Braids, Oils and a wooden wide-toothed comb.”

“I swear by washing it only once a week or longer. I love conditioner and soaking it in Apple cider vinegar. Combing it while it’s wet and air-drying are key. I like to brush it BEFORE I wash it.”

Owners of these quotes can all be found by searching the hashtag #HTHGCurlwisdom on Instagram and scrolling through comments. Again, thank you all so much for contributing!

I didn’t put links in for products because I’m simply not in the mood to try and sell anything to anyone. Just want to share your wisdom.


Do you have curly hair wisdom to share? We would sure love to hear it…..Drop it into the comment section if you feel like passing it on to us.

with much curly haired love to all, and major gratitude to all of you who shared.

Here for a list of my favorite oils, remedies and tricks for curly haired babes.

HTHG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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