Something Borrowed: Mayan Inspired Headwrap Technique

7U6A4116Today, I will share a trick that I learned from my friend Jules, who has traveled the world and learned many cool things from many different cultures. She recently came over to my house and demonstrated this great headdress, using a Free Your Hair Ceremonial Headwrap and a wrapping technique that she witnessed while spending time in Guatamala.

Traditionally, this technique would be done with a scarf like this one, called an Aquateca Headwrap.7U6A4004

‘The headdress is an important article of women’s clothing in many Highland Maya towns. One of the most beautiful is that worn by Aguatecas, who, although they have largely given up weaving their own huipiles and skirt material, still take great pride in making their headwraps. The Aguateca headwrap consists of a 2-3 inch wide cinta richly decorated with brocaded designs, and terminated at each end with large tassels. It is worn wrapped around and around the long hair, which is pulled across the forehead, with the full width of the cinta exposed across the top of the head, and the tassels dangling at each side.’

Description of the highland Maya cultural tradition of headdress, from the Traje

Today, I am excited to share with you this wonderful way to wear a long headwrap, like the Ceremonial Head Wrap featured in this tutorial, honoring a tradition from the Aguatecas peoples. This tutorial should be done on long hair, using a long scarf, wrap or ribbon (At least 4 feet long.)

Jules demonstrates:jules guatamala

Begin by finding the middle point of your scarf or ribbon. Lay it against the top of the head.

Now wrap the ends around your head, and tie them once in the back, underneath your hairline.

Take one long end, and gather your hair into a ponytail…..Begin wrapping the scarf around the base of the ponytail.

Continue wrapping down the length of the ponytail, tightly and evenly.

Once you reach the ends, grab the ends of the ponytail and the scarf tightly, and bring it up around the front of your head.

Tuck in any ends of hair that stick out, as you continue to wrap the end of the scarf around our head, wrapping the other end the other way around.

Continue wrapping both ends until they can’t wrap anymore, then tie the ends together and tuck them under the headdress.

Isn’t this trick so awesome??? I can’t wait until my hair is long enough to rock this.

xo, HTHG


Bearded Lady Rope Twists

7U6A0600Hey babes. Here is a twist on one of my favorite hairstyles of all time, The Bearded Lady, a true party-from-all-angles hairstyle which features one of my rope-twisted Ceremonial Headwraps!

Here is a little run-through of how to get this look.

Bearded Lady Rope Twists

Bearded LAdy



Begin by sectioning off all the hair on top of your head, twisting it and winding it into a large bun. Secure the bun with large bobby pins, or an NJ hair comb;)!


Now, with the hair below, split it down the center into 2 sections for your rope twists.


Take the hair on one side, pull it forward in front of your shoulder, split it in half, and make a rope twist using this technique.


Twist all the way to the ends, and then secure with a clear elastic.


Repeat on the other side, making a rope twist and securing the ends with a clear elastic.



Now wrap a Free Your Hair Ceremonial Head Wrap around your head, or just a scarf if you have one, admire your ‘do from every angle and call it a great hair day.




xo, HTHG


Ceremonial Head Wrap Tutorial

Hi honeys. I recently had the absolute luxury of an entire day to myself, in my house, cleaning done and chores cast to the side……….And a little project that had been burning a whole through my mind for over a year.

I made myself a nice cup of coffee, and I put on the news radio with the intention of catching up on some world news. I got out my fabric……….Huge swaths of linen, cotton gauze, and bamboo, and I began cutting. 4 inch strips, 9 feet long. I cut and cut until my hands ached and the blades of my scissors gnawed and hacked. Cutting things is my happy place.

100 strips later, with a gigantic pile of fabric strips and fabric lint on my living room floor, my head filled with the awfulness of war and ignorance, I turned off the radio, sneezed, and made the assertion that running these fabric strips through the wash was the right choice. Why? Because it seemed like the right thing to do.

While the strips laundered, I prepared a bucket of Indigo Dye in my back yard. I picked some veggies and weeds from the garden and juiced them, and put on some old country music.IMG_6602

When the washing machine beeped, I eagerly lifted the lid. Inside was a dreadlock of fibers and fabric. I lifted it out in a large clump. I thought to myself ‘this is going to be a long day.’

I spent the next 3 hours untangling the mess, strip by strip. I practiced breathing and having good posture while I worked, a difficult practice considering that a large part of myself felt absolutely tortured by my own stupidity for not washing the fabric before cutting it into strips! and I just kind of wanted to melt into nonexistence.

Something that the last year has really taught me, though, is that wasted time and energy is only wasted if a lesson is not learned. I thought about that, and felt better. This is a part of the process, and it is part of what will make the next time even better. I think it’s important to be kind to ourselves especially when trying new things. Needless to say, I talked myself down from the ledge with this little affirmation…….Take the lesson, enjoy the process, keep going. The Ceremony of Pushing Through!

Screen Shot 2015-10-05 at 12.55.49 PMOnce I had untangled the worlds larges fabric dreadlock, took off my shoes and went back outside where I proceeded to I dye the strips in all different ways, some I double dipped to darken them, some I krinkled up and rubber-banded and dipped in the dye bath, some I twisted into knots and dipped, and some I dipped so that they would be more gradient, like an ombre. My hands were denim blue by the end of  it, and I had blue splatters all over my feet, arms, and face. I was surrounded by 100 blue dyed strips which hung from my clothes line, gently fluttering in the wind.

After the strips dried, I braided them, twisted them, and crocheted them into long ropes and shorter bands, with the intention of adorning peoples hair and heads in a a multitude of creative and meaningful ways.

IMG_6706When I finished with the fabric, I used the last of my dye on some vintage paper roses, dipping them in one at a time and setting them in the sun……For future Blue Rose Power Crowns.IMG_7616






At the end of the day, I had 25 beautiful unique head wraps, each with it’s own personality. Two of my favorites were simple, ombre-dyed strips of linen which I had knotted every few inches from one end to the other…..They seemed the perfect ones for my daughters Marley and Selah.



Mars was kind enough to let me shoot a quick little tutorial of a lovely way to wear a head wrap such as this one.

 Head Wrap Twisted Hairstylemarstar

We began by wrapping her head with the knotted strip, it banded around twice. I wound the ends of the strip around the band a few times to secure the wrap.

Then, starting on one side, twist a small section of hair, and wind it around the bands, tucking it securly in and around the headwrap. Take another small section of hair next to the first one and repeat.

Now do the same thing, starting from the other side. Work your way towards the center, twisting winding and tucking in hair around your bands.




Over the next few months, I will be posting more ways that one can wear these hand-made beauties.

These headwraps were made with the intention of helping us find more ceremony in the small details of our daily lives, with more intention setting in our self care routine, and homage paid towards the power of adornment.

These head wraps are now available in the HTHG shop! Get yours today and let it help you ground, connect, and channel your creativity.

Made with love and light!

xo, HTHG




Sunday DIY: Rose Bud Hair Pins

7U6A3078Today, while it rained quietly outside, I made some rose-bud hair pins with bobby pins, dried rosebuds and a glue gun.

It was such a sweetly simple project which took me all of 15 minutes to complete, and left me feeling so satisfied!



Get an assortment of different bobby pins, a glue gun or a nice thick rubber-like glue, some small dried rosebuds ( I get mine from my local herbal apothacary, but they can easily be harvested, or found online through Mountain Rose Herbs) and you will also need a small piece of thick paper, cardboard or a business care or old credit card:)

I made 2 kinds of rose pins, single buds on the ends of hairpins, and a row of buds across the length of a bobby pin.

For the bobby pin one, I put the pin on a card to keep the prongs separated so they wouldn’t get glued together. Then, I gathered my rose buds, making sure to trim off loose outer petals so they were nice, neat and compact. 7U6A3034

I squeezed a small dollop of glue just above the base of the flower, low along one side. Then, I smooshed the flower directly onto the flat side of the pin, clamping it down tightly between my fingers to make sure it grabbed. Then, I did this to 5-6 more buds, squishing them tightly next to each other along the length of the pin.

7U6A3035For the single bud pins, I put a larger dollop of glue right at the base of the bud, and layed the crux of the pin right on top of the glue, allowing it to sink into the dollop and adhere to the bud.

msrleyI let them dry overnight, and woke up to lovely rose bud pins, ready to wear! (okay, I had to do a little careful yanking to get the pins off the card where the glue had seeped through and dried) No biggie.


This easy and lovely-smelling project left me very pleased, and inspired to make a pretty hairdo happen. When Mars came home from school that next day, I grabbed her for a quick little do outside in front of the grapevine.


To do this hairstyle, I started with a little twist pinned on each side, halfway to the back of the head.


Then one by one, I made three small twisted buns in a row, pinned securely and discreetly.


I finished the hairstyle with a garnish of roses and a few pretty leaves from the garden:)


If you love this sweet DIY, check our Crystal Hair Pin tutorial. I think you will love it!


Enjoy! xo, HTHG

Bearded Lady Twists

7U6A3639Hello! How is everyone? Are you enjoying the end of Summer? Have any of you tried out any of this years Bethefair Hairstyles here at HTHG?

The last one from this series for 2015 is the Bearded Lady Twists, which are a modern take on the Bearded Lady Braids from 2 years ago:)

This time, the hairstyle is demonstrated on Brette Howard, using a Nikki Jacoby Hair Comb instead of hair sticks…..And Bearded Lady Twists are an absolute dream for dirty hair! So rock them on the 3rd day to keep your style fresh and jamming when you don’t have time to wash and dry.twists

This hairstyle works for hair slightly below shoulder length and longer.

Begin by sectioning off the entire top of the head, from behind one ear straight across the back to the other ear.

Take all the hair from the top section in one hand, and twist it several times as you wind it into a bun on top of your head.

Secure your bun with a hair comb, hair stick, or bobby pins.

Now, take all the hair from below in one hand, and begin to twist it, pulling it out from the head in one direction as you twist. Now, guide the twist up and around your bun in an ‘S’ shape, which it should want to do naturally. If it isn’t working, try winding it in the other direction.

Wrap the end of your twist around your bun, tucking and pinning it into place under the bun, to secure the second twist. Add as many pins as you need to make sure your twists are very secure.

Looking sharp, woman. #bethefair

xo, HTHG



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